Texas FFA News   Subscribe
 
 
   
 
  THEN AND NOW
 
By: Shelby James, George West FFA
July 11, 2013

 
Print  
 
The Past State Officers (PSOs) set the bar high for current members. After holding the highest distinction in the state, they still recall their experience as wide-eyed Greenhands discovering what the FFA offers.

"I was interested in showing animals and chapter conducting," 1992-93 PSO Heather Foster said.

After becoming involved in FFA, Foster realized there is more than contests and enjoyed the peer and advisor support, meeting people and the public speaking opportunities made available by the organization.

The PSOs reunite each year during the Texas FFA State Convention. Their activities include a luncheon, being honored on stage and an invitation to the VIP breakfast. To some, the biggest perk is the reminiscence of their leadership experience.

"You still get that really exciting feeling of when you were a voting delegate," 1997-98 PSO Kellie Griffin said.

The PSOs continue to give back to the organization, because they see the value for the next generation of great leaders.

"I walk around the convention center, and I'm reminded why it's a good investment," 1969-70 Murray Edwards, the sponsor for the luncheon, said. Edwards is a successful entrepreneur, writing novels that include Chicken Ranch Charm School. In addition, he has business ventures of cattle, commodities and feed manufacturing. Most PSOs credit their success to the FFA.

"The skills you learn as a state officer last a lifetime," 2007-08 PSO Tyler Handrick said. "The connections you make and relationships you build help you in the future."

FFA also offered real-world applications that assisted in their careers.

"I put on a training class for bankers in my company," Charles Spiegel, 2002-03 PSO, said. "[The professionalism] was definitely a benefit of the FFA."

The purpose of the FFA remains consistent, but the organizational structure drastically changed over the years. Jim Prewitt, 1959-60 state president and 1961-62 national vice president, notes the difference after incorporating ethnic and gender diversity.

"Some of the best students we have are girls," Prewitt said."Opening the FFA to women has definitely enhanced the program."

Jack Winterrowd, Texas FFA executive secretary from 1994-98, spent many hours behind the scenes with state officers. From 1928 to 2013, service played an integral part of the organization.

"The state officers are an elite group of leaders through our organization," Winterrowd said. "They inspire young people to be better leaders."

Although FFA is known for its tradition, Prewitt sees the new horizon in future state officers.

"It's no longer just about leadership," Prewitt said. "It's about culture and value."
 


 
  SPONSORS

  NEWS ARCHIVE
2017
 
January
February
March
April
May
June
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
 
         
 
 
HOME ASSOCIATION FOUNDATION VATAT ALUMNI MYTEXASFFA NFFA